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Cats

In July 2012, new cat management laws were introduced to Tasmania. In 2016 the Tasmanian Government released its Cat Management Plan

Cats are much valued pets for many people.  It has been estimated that cats kill more than 75 million native animals a year and they can also spread diseases, to livestock, humans and wildlife. As we live in an area abundant in native wildlife, some of which are threatened, and where agriculture is an important industry, we encourage all cat owners to be responsible cat owners.

The TassieCat website is a great source of information on keeping our cats, communities and wildlife safe.  For information on cat management in Tasmania visit the state government cat management webpages.

The introduction of the Cat Management Act in 2009 initiated new efforts to tackle cat problems in Tasmania. In 2016 the Tasmanian Government released its Cat Management Plan and in 2019 it launched the Tasmanian Cat Management Project ‘TassieCat’.

It has been estimated that cats kill more than 75 million native animals a year in Australia, including some species threatened with extinction. Cats also can carry diseases which affect sheep, other animals and humans, such as toxoplasmosis which can cause miscarriage and birth defects.  As we live in an area abundant in native wildlife and livestock grazing is important to our local economy, we encourage all cat owners to understand their responsibilities as a cat owner.

Use the TassieCat website to find out how and look out for changes to cat management in Tasmania and opportunities for responsible cat management in the future.

You can find more information from the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment.
For more information on feral cat management see the Biosecurity Tasmanian feral cats website

Break O’Day Council has participated as part of a statewide push to address cat management in the past and will follow the state  Cat Management Project to take action where possible.

Under the Cat Management Act 2009 Council can declare Prohibited Areas and Cat Management Areas to encourage responsible car care and support actions to reduce cat populations in accordance with the Act.  Most Crown Land is already ‘Prohibited Area’ under the Act.